Hear the First Ever Earth-Space Duet

Nov 1, 2019

This is the music of the ~future~. Plus find out why songs get stuck in your head, how silent movies are scored, and what Saint-Saëns (and 13 other composers) looked like on video!

1. A 10-year-old astrophysicist in the United Kingdom has invented a clarinet that can be played by astronauts in space, with its own oxygen tank attached. 

2. London's Royal Opera House proves that there's something for you at the opera, no matter who you are:

3. Ode to Joy on 500 smartphones? This video may not be new, but color us impressed anyway:

4. Whatever you think about the results of the World Series, this orchestra of Baby Sharks cheering on the Nats is pretty dang cute.

5. Do you often have songs stuck in your head? Here's a fascinating read on the necessity of musical hallucinations, from Jonathan Berger at Nautilus.

6. Just in time for the spookiest day of the year, the Vision String Quartet released... a horror film. Kind of.

7. Sure, we know what a lot of old composers looked like thanks to portraits and the occasional photograph. But it's much more rare to see them on video, or hear them speak. Here are 14 videos of composers from the last century, like this film of Saint-Saëns:

8. Reggie Mobley curates the Handel and Haydn Society's free "Every Voice" concert series, and he's using it to un-whitewash classical music. (There are two of these concerts this weekend in Boston!)

9. "In the heyday of silent pictures, filmmakers expected that their movies would be scored by a live musician, and thus silent films have always been a sort of incomplete form, waiting patiently for the act of creation to happen anew each time the film is shown." From the New Yorker, here's how musicians transform silent films into fully-scored masterpieces.

10. Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson and astronaut Cady Coleman filmed the world's (and universe's?) first ever duet between earth and space: