Florence Price

When the first enslaved Africans landed on American shores in 1619, their musical traditions landed with them. Four centuries later, the primacy of African American music is indisputable, not only in this country but in much of the world. How that music has evolved, blending with or giving rise to other traditions — from African songs and dances to field hollers and spirituals, from ragtime and blues to jazz, R&B and hip-hop — is a topic of endless discussion.

Black and White Image of Florence Price
University of Arkansas

In 2009 a treasure trove of music was found in an abandoned house in Chicago. Now, for the first time, we can hear some of these works, thanks to two fantastic new EPs from pianist Lara Downes.

March 8 is International Women's Day. Classical music is a field with a pretty thick glass ceiling, so we spent the day highlighting the women who have chipped away at it. Here are just a few of the incredible women - past and present - who make great music, and who make music great.

By her own admission, composer Florence Price had two strikes against her.

Thomas Wilkins
Boston Symphony Orchestra

Saturday, March 23, 2019 (encore Monday, April 1)
8:00 PM

Thomas Wilkins leads the Boston Symphony in a rich program of rarely-heard masterpieces that reflect the broad spectrum of the American experience.